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Breakthrough In Healthcare Data Management  

By Kristen Valdes Founder and CEO At B.well™

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Breakthrough In Healthcare Data Management

“Data is not an asset that companies should have the right to own, health data is personal and should be accessible to the person it matters most to, the individual”, says Kristen Valdes, Founder & CEO, b.well. In the health care world, each company like providers, payers, point solutions, employers have their portal and they try to engage consumers in that individual aspect of their health care experience. It is then up to the customer to browse through numerous apps and find relevant information. As a health care expert, Kristen Valdes observed that lack of transparency of data between the stakeholders has made it difficult for the individuals to manage their health care needs. She was a health care consumer that struggled as her daughter, Bailey,  endured a seven year long journey of misdiagnose, expensive procedures, and a near-fatal incident due to non-availability of collated data before Kristen was able to advocate and find her diagnosis. She says, “What I needed – was a place to manage all of her healthcare information and needs in one location. So, I started b.well”.

b.well serves the health care industry by offering employers, payers and health systems an all-in-one integrated platform for consumer engagement, holistic health management, and cost containment. It was a breakthrough in the history of health care data management as until b.well came about there was no neutral, trusted, third party company providing an integrated service that offered a truly customer-centric healthcare experience which was persistent, portable and personalized.

Innovative Design

Most companies racing toward digital transformation do not concentrate on the consumer workflow, yet they expect the customers to have the finest digital experience. b.well primarily focused on the consumer workflow and took inference from their own experiences as a parent and caregiver.  Kristen took inputs from consumers from all walks of life, as well as employers, providers, insurance companies and retail organizations that were struggling to define and execute on their digital health strategy . Thus built, b.well has become a platform that unifies a consumer’s complete medical record and is able to leverage real-time information to improve a consumer’s overall health literacy. The hard part is no longer getting access to the data, its what you do with it once you’ve obtained it and cleansed it.  The b.well consumer application then puts consumers on a personal health journey by providing insights and information that is relevant to them at that time. It also helps consumers connect with the right solution for them, whether it’s transportation to a visit, access to a doctor in less than 15 minutes, or price shopping their families prescriptions to save money and improve adherence. These conveniences deliver value across the spectrum for consumers.

With this innovative design of all-in-one, b.well has earned a healthy increase in revenue, loyalty and has been able to bring out vast improvement in quality for health care companies across the spectrum. They have seen over 67% continuous active engagements, a 35% decrease in cost to administer health programs, a 20% decrease in health care spend and improved biometrics across the board. Kirsten and her team have proved it is possible to align consumers to evidence-based medicine through a digital format.

Secret Code to Success

Kirsten has established herself as a forward-thinking entrepreneur and visionary in the healthcare space. She believes “team and passion are the key drivers to success”. She is very passionate about the mission of the company and radiates it to her team. She encourages free-thinking and provides opportunities for every member to voice their opinion.

According to her, to be successful in any business it is important to listen to the needs of the target audience. She says, “You cannot design for a patient, caregiver, hospital, employer, or carrier without deeply understanding their pain points, what they are trying to accomplish and their current experience.”  She spends a lot of time in the field talking to potential clients and educating the industry on her product. She finds many of the regulations governing healthcare are outdated and actively campaigns and asks other entrepreneurs to ask for changes to make the system less transactional and more experiential.

She feels fear of failure should be there in all entrepreneurs and that will push them to perform better. She says, “ As a leader, we should always believe we’re not doing enough and that someone might catch us; it’s what keeps us pushing hard toward improvement in our space.”

Connected Health

Company: b.well™ Connected Health

Website: www.icanbwell.com

Management: Kristen Valdes, Founder and CEO

Founded Year: 2015

Headquarters: Baltimore, MD

Description: b.well is an integrated health management platform that connects consumers with a personalized digital experience to manage all aspects of their health.  For payers, the solution provides unmatched digital navigation and for health systems it becomes the single digital front door to transform and execute on digital strategy.

ISSUE 2: Top 50 Healthcare Technology CEOs of 2019

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AI to help kids struggling with ADHD, PDD-NOS and other ASD’s  

By Stephane Bourles, CIO at Brain Balance

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AI to help kids struggling with ADHD, Autism, Asperger Syndrome , PDD-NOS and other ASD’s

Left Brain or Right Brain?

In a properly functioning brain, both hemispheres communicate equally and at lightning speed, millions of times per minute. In a poorly functioning brain, the left and right sides of the brain only impart partial information, causing frequent miscommunication. This is called Functional Disconnection and is the root of many types of learning, behavioral and social problems found in children. The Brain Balance program puts the left and right brains back in sync using sensory motor exercises, academic skill building, and nutrition guidelines.

How does the Assessment Work?

The assessment consists of sensory, motor, and academic testing of more than 900 functions. The outcome of this assessment is a highly customized report providing parents with a complete understanding of their child’s behavioral, social, and academic skill levels.

We use AI to determine which brain hemisphere we believe to be stronger or weaker. The Machine Learning algorithm used for the assessment is not always accurate, which we know based on the feedback from our staff—yes we let them disagree with the system, which is intended as a tool to help them support their own assessment, but not to necessarily force them into a decision they don’t agree with.
But as valuable as an individual observation based on years of experience is, it still remains just the view of one individual. That is why we look at Artificial Intelligence as a new solution combining neural network architectures with massive computing power to enable our solution to learn a pattern from large datasets and make statistical predictions based on test results and feedback we already have for tens of thousands of students.

What is next?

Thanks to many product releases with different Machine Learning models we tested, we were able to improve our assessment accuracy and achieve precision, recall and F1 scores over 0.95. The limitation of this AI model is it is not 100% accurate and you don’t know for sure the source of truth. Since AI is a “black box” which can’t explain its prediction for most models, you have to trust your staff first.

Similar to clinical decision support systems helping healthcare practitioners, we believe this fast growing dataset about children, combined with new Artificial Intelligence models such as Explainable AI, will help our staff improve a child’s initial assessment, which will then improve our overall program’s results.

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The importance of information to empower health-app users  

By Liz Ashall-Payne, CEO, ORCHA

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Shining a light between the rock and the hard place: The importance of information to empower health-app users

Apps, and their use for the promotion of health and wellbeing, are the subject of increasing interest and enquiry; particularly in light of the NHS’ Long Term Plan, and ever-increasing pressures on scarce NHS resources. But finding and downloading effective, engaging, and most importantly, safe health-apps, is a significant challenge. While many have suggested that health-apps could be a ‘silver-bullet’, aimed at quashing the woes that stem from decreasing funding and increasing demand for incumbent NHS services, it is important to tread with caution.

Unlike pharmaceuticals, over the counter remedies, talking therapies, physiotherapy or surgery, health-apps can not only be sought, but readily obtained in absence of gatekeeping and safeguarding. The result is that you or I can download upwards of 200,000 health-apps today, with as little as a click of a button on the app-store. While this can be argued as the unique value-proposition of app-based health technologies, a lack of guarantees regarding the quality and content of such apps, means that this open-access feature of apps also represents the chief concern; and is likely limiting the enthusiasm with which healthcare professionals engage and promote their use.

The number of apps labelled as ‘pranks’ or for ‘illustration purposes only’ has been subject to year-on-year growth. But for those looking for convenient, easily accessible, and often cost-free support; or for those who are either vulnerable or impressionable; such technologies can pose significant health risks, beyond those that are apparent and conveyed (if at all) in the short description within the app store. An app that misleadingly claims to monitor blood pressure or blood sugar for example, may result in either (1) misleading information, (2) modifications to disease management not representative of true disease status (including the use of insulin or warfarin), or (3) serious adverse events including hypoglycaemia or stroke. One such app for monitoring blood pressure has been downloaded upwards of 1,000,000 times on the Android Google Play app store, while boasting a review rating of 4.3/5.

This raises questions regarding the utility of both the subjective user review score (which is inherently limited in only capturing both very positive or very negative views) and the number of prior downloads of an app, as potential surrogates for app quality. Recent research into apps targeted at chronic insomnia disorder conducted by the Organisation for the Review of Care and Health Applications (ORCHA) confirmed this. In this analysis, which is now available in the journal BMJ: Evidence-Based Mental Health, it was demonstrated that both user review scores, and the number of prior downloads of a health-app, were not only unreliable as proxies for quality, but in fact were inversely related; and as these metrics increased, the objectively measured quality of apps decreased (as assessed by presence of clinical evidence, data privacy policies etc.) This has left a considerable void regarding where reliable indicators of the safety and quality of app-based health technologies can be found, something which at least in part, has been tackled by the National Health Service (NHS).

Courtesy of the NHS’s digital assessment questionnaire (DAQ), and the NHS apps library (beta version), the number of ‘accredited’ and NHS-approved health-apps is increasing, albeit at a leisurely pace, with approximately 50 apps accredited so far. While a step in the right direction, the rigour with which such reviews are conducted comes at the expense of speed, and an estimated review time of 6-8 weeks, limits the possibility of such initiatives being conducted at scale. As such, the difference between the total number of health-apps available (~300,000), and those which have been quality-tested and approved by regulators or accreditation bodies (~50); is if anything, increasing; leaving little or no information regarding the validity, efficacy, and most importantly the safety, of 99.99% of health-apps available today; which to date have been downloaded by potential users upwards of 50million times.

This is where the Organisation for the Review of Care and Health Applications (ORCHA) aim to transform the process of health-app research and information provision. Positioned as an open-access, free of charge and publicly facing repository regarding the user experience, clinical efficacy, and data privacy of thousands of health-apps, ORCHA’s aim is simple; to empower and inform potential users of health-apps regarding potential risks and benefits, prior to committing to use. Through a structured, objective and peer-reviewed assessment, consisting of 160 question areas, answered on a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ basis, ORCHA provides information to the 99% of users of health-apps, which are yet to be formally assessed by health technology assessment bodies, and in doing so, ORCHA removes the information asymmetry that is currently clouding the health-app market in, distrust, disbelief, and uncertainty. Publishing a new review of a health-app every 30minutes on average, ORCHA pull in information for all 300,000+ apps available on both iOS and Android Google Play, organise these into medically approved sub-categories (including diabetes, mental health and diet and exercise), and then order these apps from the most to the least downloaded.

In doing so, ORCHA believe that focusing attention on providing information about the risks and benefits of apps currently used the most, and those which others are most likely to download, is likely to have the largest overall impact on the safety and effectiveness with which such apps are used. By providing a short, sharp summary of each app, prior to download, highlighting concerns including the lack of a data privacy policy, a lack of evidence to support claims of effectiveness, or a lack of accessibility options for those who are hard of sight or hearing for example; ORCHA is providing information regarding the ‘many’ health apps currently in use, and eliminating the information uncertainty that not only limits the allure of health-apps, but also puts users at risk when unknowingly using health-apps which do not look after your data, and may cause physical harm if used in the belief that they are approved medical technologies.

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Barbara Howard, MD to Receive the 2019 C. Anderson Aldrich Award  

By Karen Gauthier Sales & Marketing Coordinator, Total Child Health

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August 20, 2019

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics announced that Barbara Howard, MD will receive the 2019 C. Anderson Aldrich Award.

The C. Anderson Aldrich Award is bestowed by the Section on Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics of the American Academy of Pediatrics to honor professionals who have made outstanding contributions to the field of child development. Its earlier recipients include some of the world’s most famous pediatricians, such as Benjamin Spock and T. Berry Brazelton; child psychiatrists, such as Anna Freud, and Sir Michael Llewellyn Rutter and child psychologists, such as Erik Erickson.

Howard is a Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician who trained with Dr. T. Berry Brazelton at Harvard University.  Dr. Howard is probably the most popular and beloved teacher and recognized care innovator of developmental and behavioral aspects of pediatrics in the United States.  She has been a frequently invited national speaker over the past several decades and at one point was noted by the AAP as the highest-rated speaker of any specialty in pediatrics.

Pediatricians also have had access to her wisdom about practical approaches to developmental and behavioral aspects of pediatrics through a regular column in the free Pediatric News over the past two decades.  Many pediatricians have attended the free monthly case conferences through a federal grant she has had continuously for thirty years, first in person and in recent years as a national webcast.  Pediatric residents at Hopkins, Duke, Sinai, and U Mass have benefited and she also co-directed a fellowship program to train developmental and behavioral pediatricians as a faculty member at Johns Hopkins, where she continues a faculty role.

In recent years, Barbara has used an innovative online “clinical process support system”, called CHADIS to provide “moment of care” education to pediatricians specifically related to their own patients via pre-visit questionnaires, reaching 3,000 pediatricians for over 2 million of their patients.

Dr. Howard was past President of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. She was a contributing author for Bright Futures™, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Primary Care (DSM-PC) and Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health and has served on national committees of the American Academy of Pediatrics.  Dr. Howard has also made contributions by leading thirteen NIH and CDC funded research programs in areas such as autism, ADHD, asthma, infant mental health and current grants for Social Determinants of Health, teen depression and substance use prevention.  These research programs have made contributions to the literature and also evidence to support modules in CHADIS that continue to teach and guide pediatricians family medicine doctors and now branching out to mental health providers and adult medicine.

Howard will receive the award during the 2019 AAP National Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans, LA on Saturday, October 26, 2019.

The mission of Total Child Health, Inc. is to provide products and services that improve mental and physical health. In particular, the company focuses on the development and distribution of CHADIS (CHADIS.com).

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